Gallery

Collective nouns

Platypuses
Platypuses

A PARADOX OF PLAYTPUSES. Ornithorhynchus anatinus. Duck-billed platypus belong to a sub-group of mammals that lay eggs rather than giving birth to live young. When the first platypus was shipped to Britain from Australia, people thought it was a joke and that someone had sewn a duck's bill to a mammal's body. They are the only venomous mammal, with small poisonous barbs by their feet.

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Narwhals
Narwhals

A BLESSING OF NARWHALS. Monodon monoceros. The 'unicorn of the sea' can dive a mile and a half deep in the ocean. Males sometimes cross tusks, but the purpose is not yet clear. It could be a form of duel, a way to clean their tusks, or perhaps just friendly.

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Otters
Otters

A ROMP OF OTTERS. Lutra lutra. Otters are inquisitive, playful semi-aquatic mammals. However, the pups initially fear water and sometimes have to be pushed in by their mother.

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Turtles
Turtles

SEA TURTLES. Cheloniidae. Sea turtles can live up to 80 years and spend most of their lives submerged. They mate at sea and the females come ashore to lay their eggs. A hatchling’s gender is dependent on the temperature of the sand. Climate change is affecting sea turtle populations as warmer temperatures cause an increase in the proportion of hatching female turtles and a decrease in the number of males.

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30 animals in 30 days

Wandering albatross
Wandering albatross

WANDERING ALBATROSS. Albatrosses spend most of their life on the wing, and they also mate for life. At the start of the mating season, the couple will dance a complex dance in order to reaffirm their bond after months apart at sea.

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Owl
Owl

OWL. Strix Aluco. Tawny owls emit the characteristic courtship ‘twit-twooo’ which is actually a duet between male and female. Labour is divided between breeding pairs since the female incubates the clutch of eggs, and the male is responsible for feeding the chicks once they hatch.

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Orangutan
Orangutan

ORANGUTAN. Pongo. The word orangutan comes from the Malay language and means 'person of the forest'. They share 96.4% of our DNA and male orangutans grow a beard and moustache when they become adults. They also tend to make umbrellas for themselves out of big leaves when it rains.

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Mole
Mole

MOLE. Talpa europaea. Moles are industrious diggers and can create 20m of tunnel per day. Large chambers within the tunnel system are lined with dry grass and used for nesting during periods of rest. Moles have highly sensitive noses and are almost entirely blind.

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Grizzly
Grizzly

GRIZZLY BEAR. Ursos arctos horribilis. Grizzly bears spend nearly half their lives underground in a state of hibernation. Females even give birth during the winter, usually to twins. Mothers will lose a staggering 40% of their body weight in the process.

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Badger
Badger

BADGER. Meles Meles. Like humans, they are omnivorous, although unlike us, they eat several hundred earthworms every night.

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Zebra
Zebra

ZEBRA. Equus quagga. Each zebra's stripes are as unique as fingerprints—no two are exactly alike. Scientists still aren't sure why they have stripes.The patterns may make it difficult for predators to identify a single animal from a running herd and distort distance at dawn and dusk. Because of their uniqueness, stripes may also help zebras recognize one another.

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Tiger
Tiger

The Bengal Tiger is critically endangered but in previous years their population has been increasing in Nepal. Despite growing up to 9ft long they are extremely agile tree climbers.

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Dartmoor pony
Dartmoor pony

DARTMOOR PONY. Hoof-prints found on Dartmoor during an archaeological excavation in the 1970s show that domesticated ponies were to be found there around 3,500 years ago.

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Water vole
Water vole

WATER VOLE. Arvicola amphibius. Ratty, in Kenneth Grahame's 'The Wind in the Willows', was actually a water vole. The waterside burrows of these strong swimmers have many floor levels that hinder flooding, as well as nesting chambers and a food store for the long winter months.

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Woodpecker
Woodpecker

WOODPECKER. Dendrocopos Major. Great spotted woodpeckers are the most widespread and numerous woodpecker in the UK. They have a large range covering almost the entire Palearctic from Britain in the west to Japan in the east and reaching North Africa and the Canary Islands in the south-west.

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Eider duck
Eider duck

EIDER DUCK. Somateria mollissima. In Greenland, eiders often nest near tethered huskies - a clever tactic which protects their eggs and young from predators. The female eider lines her nest with soft, downy feathers plucked from her own breast. In Iceland, these feathers are harvested after the chicks are grown and have no more need for the nest. The contents of 85 nests will fill one duvet.

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Botanical illustration

Pineapple
Pineapple
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Botanical collection
Botanical collection
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Carnation
Carnation
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Carnation watercolour study
Carnation watercolour study
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Commissions and gifts

Commissions and gifts

Barn owls
Barn owls
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Octopus's Garden
Octopus's Garden

For some Beatles fans!

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Sifaka low res
Sifaka low res
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wandering albatros couple
wandering albatros couple
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Weird and Wonderful

Pangolin
Pangolin

The pangolin is the only mammal in the world that is entirely covered in scales. It has a peculiar gait, wobbling along on its hind legs. Its tongue is longer than its own body, and it uses it to slurp up insects. It doesn't have teeth so can't chew its food - instead, it is ground up by stones and keratinous spines inside their stomachs. Sadly, the Pangolin is endangered due to an illegal trade in its scales used in traditional Chinese medicines.

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yeti crab
yeti crab

Seventh in the weird and wonderful series is the Yeti Crab (Kiwa hirsuta) - a hairy crustacean discovered in 2005 in the South Pacific Ocean.

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Lowland streaked tenrec
Lowland streaked tenrec

Third in the series of weird and wonderful beasts to celebrate David Attenborough's 90th birthday is the lowland streaked tenrec. The streaked tenrec lives in Madagascar. If threatened by a predator (most commonly a fossa or Malagasy mongoose), he can be a vicious opponent. The tenrec erects the barbed quills on its back and on the crest around its head, pointing them completely forward, and drives them in to the attacker's nose or paws with body and head movements.

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Axolotl
Axolotl

The axolotl is a type of cave-dwelling Mexican salamander. Although the axolotl is colloquially known as a "walking fish", it is not a fish, but an amphibian.

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